Daily Record

Mark McGivern.

Reporter

0141 309 32318


THERE are some times you wish you had the all-seeing and all- knowing

powers we believe Mystic Meg to have - especially on Wednesday and Saturday

nights.

That's how George Kerr, a senior trainer at Moray College in Aberdeen felt

when assessing what work would be coming into the district so that students

could train in the right skills to maximise their chances of getting the

jobs available.

He was so determined to find that `mystical' way of finding jobs he gave up

his career to concentrate on finding it.

Now that he has developed the software idea which he has copyrighted, he is

selling it to major companies as a cost-effective business tool.

"I used to win bets with colleagues and students about the number of jobs

in the daily paper in a week.

"They'd look at the jobs pages and find 100 or so. I'd look at the business

pages, the letters pages - where people would complain about new

developments on their doorstep, public notices for planning permissions and

news stories of companies moving," said George who lives in Fraserburgh.

"I'd count as many as 3000 new jobs about to be made available."

His job at the further education college was to motivate people through

training and back to work.

"They need this kind of information to know there is a job at the end of

the line."

NOW he has a database of more than 200,000 unadvertised jobs about to come

on stream around the UK.

Under his company name of Terec - Training and Educational Requirements for

Employment Choices - his system enables people to check out the job market

early enough to give them time to secure the appropriate training.

It also provides companies with a valuable resource in knowing which

possible competitors are on the horizon. Other companies would find the

information useful to enable them to knock on the door of an in-coming

business early enough to secure important, new contracts.

"This is all about giving people employment choices. They can see the job

they want to do and will know from the data it will be up for grabs in a

specific period of time," said George.

"If the person doesn't have the appropriate skills they have time to

acquire them. A college or training provider has time to organise courses

to suit and the future employer knows they can save on recruitment costs as

there will be a pool of trained workers ready when they open their door.

"The market for this is massive," said George. He has already signed up

major companies such as Hanson & Robertson Insurance and Aberdeen College

to sponsor the electronic pages. Others are currently at advanced stages of

negotiation.

Leading UK training providers - including some in London - have been given

demonstrations of the Terec system and are also expected to sign up

shortly.

"From pilot studies we've done, around 70 pe cent of people using this go

into employment," commented George.

The Federation of Small Business has also expressed interest in the scheme.

While he has been disappointed in the lack of interest in the idea from

careers people in schools and colleges, George believes this is the way to

find a job in the future.

A Paisley man, who supports St Mirren, George is convinced his system will

be commonplace by the time his five-year-old grandson is job searching.

Currently there are 466,843 Potential Employment 'Choices' available to our clients

Potential Employment 'Choices' in

6211

And Town/City in

2790